Sunday, 12 October 2014 15:56

Thanks for Everything

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So should we say, “Thank you for everything?” even the difficult, the painful, the unexpected, and the hard? Well, based on the little comedy sketch, it is certainly possible. We’ve been playing with this concept around here of late and it’s opened our eyes to some unseen blessings. Even in the hardest of trial we have found good. And surprisingly, even in the highest of joys we can still find bad.

“Come what may and love it.” (Joseph Wirthlin)

This quote is written on my office wall. Surrounding it are pictures of my husband and I spanning thirty-five years of marriage. Hair color, hair thickness, body size, and fashions all ebb and flow through the photographs, but joy shines out from each picture. When looking at those pictures, it would be easy to assume that ours has been a charmed life, that no trial or heartache has touched our lives. It would be a completely wrong assumption. Just this past month has been filled with a crazy ride of success and failure, pure joy and heart-wrenching heartache, excruciating pain and simple pleasures. But every day, I walk in my office and there’s that quote, “Come what may and love it.”

Lately, it’s been reminding me of a TV show from my youth called, Hee Haw. Occasionally a man named Archie Campbell would do a little sketch called, “That’s Good – That’s Bad.” In it, each potentially bad event is identified as good and each potentially good event is identified as bad. In essence, attitude is everything. I found a darling video of some charter school kids doing a version of this sketch. You can find it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6bstjYBT1w

So should we say, “Thank you for everything?” even the difficult, the painful, the unexpected, and the hard? Well, based on the little comedy sketch, it is certainly possible. We’ve been playing with this concept around here of late and it’s opened our eyes to some unseen blessings. Even in the hardest of trial we have found good. And surprisingly, even in the highest of joys we can still find bad.

When it comes to sharing story, this is a vital thing to remember. No single story is all good or all bad. In fact, a story without some form of conflict or trouble is usually not a story it’s an incident. An incident is part of a story, but it’s not the whole story. We must have progress, someone must gain an insight for the story to become meaningful.

So, take the good with the bad and the bad with the good and give thanks for everything. Twisted and wrapped through the fibers of experience are the stories that will enlighten and inspire for generations to come. If you’ll keep your eye’s wide open and your heart receptive to the lessons of every moment you may just find that, come what may, you can love it!

Reflect back over your past month. What happened that was good? What happened that was bad? Can you find the opposites in each experience? Can you find the bad with the good and the good with the bad? Can you give thanks for everything?

 

 

Last modified on Sunday, 14 December 2014 14:51
Teresa Clark

A national award-winning storyteller, historian and author, she is best known for her original works and recollections of life's experiences blended with history. Teresa has presented and performed throughout the United States. Of her, it has been said, "Charming, witty, soulful, and wise, her performances are filled with a compelling sense of wonder and an irresistable zest for life." Her story work involves performance, education, production, and advocacy. From the main stage to individual consultations in living rooms across America, she delights in the excavation and sharing of family story. Most importantly, she is a wife, mother, and grandmother to her favorite playmates and best friends.

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